Frida, Diego, Bullfighters, Mummies and More: George’s Guide to Mexico City – South of the Center

After you have seen all the sights of central México City, it’s time to head south.

Visitors to the largest city on the planet rightly concentrate their time and energy in the Historic Center and surrounding neighborhoods. There, barely below the surface of the Zocalo lie the Templo Mayor and other wonders of the former Aztec city of Tenochtitlan. Above it stand México City’s most important monuments: the Cathedral, National Palace, and the Zocalo itself, the country’s vast Main Square. Sophisticated Paseo de la Reforma connects the heart of the city with Chapultepec Park and its embarrassment of riches: museums, lakes, playgrounds, gardens, and even a real castle – the former home of Mexico’s emperor and presidents.

But, it would be a mistake for visitors not to hop on the convenient Metro and experience what lies outside México City’s tightly packed central district, Reforma’s embassies and hotels, or Chapultepec’s tempting attractions.

On the south side of Chapultepec Park, life and death are located practically side by side on Avenida Constituyentes: Parque Acuatico Atlantis, a kids’ amusement park, and Panteón de Dolores, México’s largest and perhaps creepiest cemetery. Roughly following Avenida Insurgentes below Paseo de la Reforma, a chain of mesmerizing neighborhoods are just a short subway or bus ride away.

  • In Colonia Nápoles, the Poliforum Siqueiros contains the world’s largest mural.
  • A little farther south in Colonia Noche Buena stands Plaza México, the world’s largest bullring.
  • Spend a day in San Ángel, shopping in Plaza San Jacinto’s Jardín del Arte on Saturdays or in the swanky boutiques of Calle Altavista.
  • Coyoacán is a must see for any visitor to México City, where the Museo Frida Kahlo preserves the artist’s home as a museum showcasing her art and controversial life.
  • The Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México (UNAM) is located in Ciudad Universitaria, where you can tour the Central Library with its iconic Juan O’Gorman mosaic exterior.

Chapultepec Park

Panteón Civil de Dolores

México’s largest cemetery, the Panteón de Dolores, is a jumbled, mostly unkempt but fascinating place. Opened in 1875 and named for Dolores Murrieta de Galloso, who donated the 2,400,000 sq m (787,401 sq ft) property, the Panteón is the eternal home of 700,000 souls who rest in simple graves and elaborate mausoleums. México’s most honored citizens lay in the Rotunda of Illustrious Persons, an open-air plaza, including painter Diego Rivera, Nobel Prize-winning author Octavio Paz, and actress Dolores Del Río.

Parque Acuático Atlantis

Children under the age of 10 will enjoy Parque Acuático Atlantis, a marine-themed kiddie park in Bosque de Chapultepec in central México City. Cartoon-colored buildings dot the grounds selling cheap souvenirs and popcorn, with open-air snack bars serving movie theater-style nachos and other amusement park fare. The prime attractions at Atlantis are shows starring the park’s 5 dolphins, 3 sea lions and a flock of tropical birds. Children’s carnival rides like helicopters and a train cost eight pesos per ride.


Colonia Napoles

Polyforum Siqueiros

Polyforum Siqueiros contains the world’s largest mural, the final work by renowned Mexican artist David Alfaro Siqueiros. This dynamic building, 12-sided on the exterior and an octagon on the interior, is an enormous canvas for Siqueiros’ sculpted painting. The March of Humanity vividly covers 4,331 sq m (46,618 sq ft) of curving walls and ceiling, depicting man’s journey from violence to peace. Siqueiros, whose political beliefs were as complicated as his style of painting, died in 1971 after completing this masterpiece.


Colonia Noche Buena

Mexico City: Plaza Mexico, The World's Largest Bullring (http://www.torobull.com/images/plaza-de-toros-mexico.jpg)

Plaza México

Before there was soccer, México’s national sport was bullfighting and it remains extremely popular today. The world’s largest bullring is located in México City, the Plaza México, with seats for over 50,000 cheering fans that have been coming to this stadium since 1946. The bullfighting season takes place from April to September approximately. On any given Sunday you can experience the “corrido de toros,” with the best flashily clad international bullfighters competing against tough, obviously angry, Mexican bulls.


San Ángel

San Ángel

Tranquil San Ángel used to be a country pueblo that served as a summer retreat for the capital’s rich and famous. México City long ago encircled San Ángel, which remains today a highly desirable and expensive residential neighborhood.

Artists and craftsmen gather every Saturday in Plaza San Jacinto, San Ángel’s main square, for the Jardín del Arte, a fun art market that can yield some real treasures.

Prominent among San Ángel’s captivating attractions are the 16th century San Jacinto Church, Museo del Carmen, Museo Casa del Risco and the Museo de Arte Carrillo Gil, an outstanding modern art museum.

Follow narrow lanes as they twist and turn heading toward Calle Altavista. You might catch glimpses into the elegant homes of San Ángeleños, hidden behind stone walls. Some of México City’s toniest boutiques line Calle Altevista, also the location of the Museo Casa Estudio Diego Rivera. You can visit the artist’s studio and see the bed in which he died.

Bazar Sábado/Plaza San Jacinto

A popular weekend tradition for chilangos, as citizens of México City are called, is to visit San Ángel’s Plaza San Jacinto for lunch at a sidewalk café then stroll through the Bazar Sábado, or Saturday Market.  The market’s picturesque Jardín del Arte, or art garden, is a once-a-week showcase featuring the work of local artists and craftsmen. Paintings predominate, but jewelry, ceramics, and textiles are displayed here, too.  These artists love to talk about their work so, stop and chat.


Museo Casa del Risco (Centro Cultural Isidro Fabela)

San Ángel’s Museo Casa del Risco, or House of the Cliff, is an 18th century palace, once the family home of Don Isidro Fabela and Doña Josefina de Fabela. Now it is a free museum, located on Plaza San Jacinto that displays the couple’s extensive collection of 14th to 19th century European and Mexican art. The Casa’s most popular and amusing feature is two-story fountain, which is quirkily encrusted with broken pieces of seashells, Talavera pottery and Chinese porcelain.


Museo del Carmen

The Ex Convento Carmelita de San Ángel, now the Museo del Carmen, is an 18th century church and monastery, built by Fray Andrés de San Miguel. The museum houses an important collection of New Spain religious art by such painters as Cristóbal de Villalpando, Miguel Cabrera, and Juan Correa. The 50 tiny wax dancers and musicians by 20th century artist Carmen Antúnez illustrate traditional costumes and rituals. Don’t miss the catacombs with their 12 macabre mummies of 19th century priests!


Mexico City: San Angel - Museo Carrillo Gil

Museo de Arte Carrillo Gil

The Museo de Arte Carrillo Gil in San Ángel occupies an important place in México City’s modern art world. The museum houses 1,775 works, most of them from the personal collection of Dr. Álvar and Carmen Carrillo Gil, who gave it to the Mexican people. Carrillo Gil, a businessman from Yucatán, first purchased a José Clemente Orozco drawing titled La Chole, and began collecting Mexican and international artists. Works by Klee, Rouault, Braque, Kandinsky, Rivera, and Siqueiros round out the collection.



Museo Casa Estudio Diego Rivera y Frida Kahlo

Artists Diego Rivera and Frida Kahlo lived and worked from 1934 to 1940 in this San Ángel compound, which preserves Rivera’s studio as if he just left, brushes and paint ready to be used. The buildings are a masterpiece of Modernist architecture, designed by their friend, Juan O’Gorman. The two houses Diego and Frida inhabited say something about their stormy relationship: the houses are bridged, but separate. Imagine poor, sick Frida, climbing all those stairs just to see her husband!


Coyoacán


Coyoacán

Residents of México City and visitors both adore Coyoacán. They come to the neighborhood because of its unique charm: quiet shady cobblestone streets, colonial homes, and the strong presence of a vibrant artistic community.

Prominent 20th century artists gave Coyoacán its reputation as a bohemian refuge. Located in the southern part of the México City, Coyoacán was called home by Frida Kahlo and Diego Rivera, actress Dolores del Río and filmmaker Luis Buñuel, who lived here during his exile from Franco’s fascist Spain.

A visit to Coyoacán should include its most important sights: the Main Square’s Plaza Hidalgo and Centennial Garden, San Juan Bautista Church, Museo Frida Kahlo, Casa Trotsky, Plaza de la Conchita, and the Museum of Popular Culture.

Spend at least a day in Coyoacán visiting these places. But it is much more important to wander Coyoacán’s neighborhoods, enjoy lunch at a sidewalk café, and linger in this very special corner of México City, long into the night.


Plaza de la Conchita

The Plaza de la Conchita is one of Coyoacán’s small pleasures. It is a tranquil, little public square named for the adjacent Capilla de la Conchita, or Chapel of Conchita, as the Virgin of the Immaculate Conception is nicknamed. Sharing the plaza with the 18th century Baroque church is the Casa Colorada, popularly known as the Casa de la Malinche. Don’t be fooled, this is not the house Cortés built for his Aztec mistress – it merely stands in the same place.


Plaza Central (Plaza Hidalgo and Jardín del Centenario)

Coyoacán’s “downtown” is one of México City’s best places to just sit and watch the world go by. Made up of the adjoining Plaza Hidalgo and Jardín del Centenario, the Plaza Central is filled with elegantly trimmed gardens, fountains, tree-shaded benches, and, of course, people of every age and description. Restaurants, bars, and stores encircle the plaza: buy an ice cream at Las Nieves de Coyoacán, sit down and enjoy the street performers.

The Casa de Cortés and Parroquia de San Juan Bautista form the park’s glorious backdrop. Spanish conquistador Hernan de Cortés ruled his empire from the Casa de Cortés, located to the north of Plaza Hidalgo, a safe distance from Tenochtitlan, the Aztec city he destroyed, now México City’s Zócalo. The Baroque Parroquia de San Juan Bautista, completed in 1582, is the scene of elaborate weddings on Saturdays.

The Plaza Central hosts a bustling public market on Saturdays. A trolley bus offering narrated tours of Coyoacán departs hourly.


Museo Nacional de Culturas Populares

The Museo Nacional de Culturas Populares displays an ever-changing view of México’s popular culture. Founded in 1982, the museum is a complex of exhibition halls and patios where rural and urban voices mix together to celebrate the Mexican way of life. One wall of the entrance courtyard is decorated with a 16-foot tall ceramic tree, depicting 500 years of national heroes, native plants, and the Popocatepetl and Iztaccihuatl volcanos. There is always something unexpected and fascinating to be enjoyed here.

"Frida and Diego lived in this house from 1929 to 1954."

Museo Frida Kahlo

Lone among 20th century artists, Frida Kahlo’s face is instantly recognized by millions of people around the world. Known for disturbingly intimate self-portraits, Frida lived 47 years of pain and passion. She barely survived a bus accident at age 18 when she was impaled on a metal bar, references to which appear again and again in her paintings. Frida’s turbulent marriage four years later to the much older Mexican muralist Diego Rivera has been the fodder for books and movies – they were the art world’s radical power couple in the 1930s.

The Casa Azul, where Frida was born, lived and died, remains untouched by time, although Frida died in 1954 and the house-museum opened four years later, at Diego’s instructions. Located in the leafy suburb of Coyoacán, the Casa Azul is painted the same vivid blue seen in Frida’s work. Among the paintings displayed here is Frida and the Caesarean, from 1931, a painful subject for the woman who desperately wanted children and never did.

Visitors pass through galleries, kitchen and dining room, but most fascinating are Frida’s bedrooms, one each for day and night. Her doll collection, clothing, paintbrushes and easel illustrate the storied life of México’s Communist queen.


Museo Casa de León Trotsky

Soviet revolutionary Leon Trotsky spent his final years of exile in Coyoacán, where he was brutally murdered by an assassin dispatched by archrival Joseph Stalin.

Trotsky, wife Natalya Sedova, and grandson Seva lived happily (but in constant fear of attack) at the corner of Avenidas Viena and Morelos in a house now called Casa Trotsky. It is more fortress than home. Inside, thick steel doors separate rooms, and windows are bricked in. Outside, the house’s delicate Neo-Gothic style contrasts with the menacing gun slits of a watchtower.

Trotsky’s library fills the bookcases of the house, which retains much of his personal furniture including the Dictaphone into which he recorded his thoughts. Curiously, Trotsky raised chickens and rabbits – the coops and hutches remain in the garden today, as well as cactus he planted, which grow around the memorial containing his ashes.

Before entering Casa Trotsky, visitors pass through a modern exhibition hall where photographs of Trotsky and his family are displayed.


Who was Leon Trotsky?

Leon Trotsky was born on November 7, 1879 in Ukraine, then part of the Russian empire. In 1896 he began 20 years of revolutionary activity, imprisonment and exile. Tsar Nicholas II was overthrown in 1917 and Trotsky returned from the Bronx, New York to become Vladimir Lenin’s right hand man.

Josef Stalin and Trotsky engaged in a fierce battle to succeed Lenin whose health began to deteriorate in 1921. It appeared that Lenin had anointed Trotsky the Soviet Union’s next leader.

In 1924, Lenin died. Stalin tricked the vacation-bound Trotsky into delaying his return to Moscow. In Trotsky’s absence Stalin presided over an enormous public memorial service, won the power struggle and expelled Trotsky from Russia in 1929.

Trotsky hid in France, Turkey and Norway until 1936 when the Soviets condemned him to death. Diego Rivera convinced México to grant Trotsky political asylum. After living with Rivera and Frida Kahlo, Trotsky and wife Natalya Sedova finally created a home of their own in Coyoacán.

During his years in México City Trotsky wrote furiously, criticizing Stalin’s increasingly repressive regime. In May 1940, Mexican painter David Alfaro Siqueiros, a confirmed Stalinist, and other comrades fired machineguns into the house. Miraculously, Trotsky, Sedova, and grandson Seva survived. Trotsky moved quickly to improve the security at his “little fortress.”

It was not enough. On August 20, 1941, Ramón Mercador entered Trotsky’s study. Stalin’s henchman pulled an ice axe from his coat sleeve and plunged it into Trotsky’s skull.

Trotsky whispered simply to his wife, “Now it is done.” He died one day later and was honored with a funeral cortege of 250,000 grieving Mexican citizens. Trotsky and Sedova’s remains lie in a sober stone monument in the garden. Above the grave flutters a red flag, now faded, of the country that Trotsky changed forever.


University Area

Located in southern México City, Ciudad Universitaria, or University City, is home to the 300,000 students who attend the Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México (UNAM), México’s largest and most significant university. It is the oldest one in the Americas, founded as the Royal and Pontifical University in 1551.

Architects Mario Pani and Enrique del Moral designed the campus, which was completed in 1954 and became a UNESCO World Cultural Heritage Site in 2007.

Prominent among University City’s buildings are the Central Library with its iconic Juan O’Gorman mosaic and the Rectory Tower, notable for its murals by David Alfaro Siqueiros. Ciudad Universitaria hosted the 1968 Summer Olympic Games and the Olympic Stadium still welcomes athletes today.

The University Cultural Center, Netzahualcoyotl Concert Hall, and the University Science Museum draw large crowds, as do a botanical garden and ecological reserve. At the university’s southern end stand the ruins of Cuicuilco, perhaps the earliest civilization in Central México, dating to 700 BC.

The Library (and Juan O’Gorman mosaic)

UNAM’s 1952 Central Library, a ten-story edifice covered with the world’s largest mosaic, is the work of Juan O’Gorman, artist and architect, born in 1905 to an Irish father and Mexican mother.

Each façade of the Library has its own symbolic theme: Pre-Hispanic culture on the north, Spanish colonization on the south, modern México on the east, and Pre-Hispanic, popular and student motifs on the west. Over 3,000,000 individual stone and glass tiles compose the mosaic, with each Mexican state having contributed materials.

Images of Mexico City: South of the Center


Logistical Information for Mexico City – South of the Center


Getting to and away

  • By Car: Av. Insurgentes Sur to Colonias Nápoles and Noche Buena, San Ángel, Coyoacán, and Ciudad Universitaria. To Xochimilco: Av. Insurgentes Sur to Ruiz Freeway east
  • By Taxi: Radio Taxi +52 (55) 5570-6024) or use one with a meter. Fares range from MX$40 to 250/US$4 to 25.
  • By Métro, or Metrobús Insurgentes (from Paseo de la Reforma):
  • Col. Nápoles, Poliforum Siqueiros: Métro: Line 9, Chilpancingo Station.
  • Metrobús Insurgentes: Poliforum Station. 15 minutes from Paseo de la Reforma
  • Col. Noche Buena, Plaza México: Métro: Line 7, San Antonio Station.  Metrobús Insurgentes: Ciudad de los Deportes Station. 20 minutes from Paseo de la Reforma
  • San Ángel: Métro: Line 7, Barranca del Muerto Station.  Metrobús Insurgentes: Altavista and La Bombilla Stations.  30 minutes from Paseo de la Reforma
  • Coyoacán: Métro: Line 3, Viveros, Coyoacán and Miguel Ángel de Quevado Stations.  Metrobús Insurgentes: Francia and Olivo Stations (3 km (2 mi) to the Main Square). 30 minutes from Paseo de la Reforma
  • Ciudad Universitaria: Métro: Line 3, Copilco or Universidad Stations.  Metrobús Insurgentes: Dr. Galvez or Ciudad Universitaria Stations. 45 minutes from Paseo de la Reforma

Chapultepec

Panteón Civil de Dolores

  • Location: Avenida Constituyentes No. 447, between sections two and three of Chapultepec Park
  • How to Get There:
  • By Taxi: from Paseo de la Reforma, about MX$40/US$4.
  • By Métro/Bus: From Chapultepec Métro station take bus #24 Panteón de Dolores/Hacienda.
  • By car: From Paseo de la Reforma, travel south on Constituyentes about 10 minutes. The Panteón is on the right side.
  • Hours of Operation: 8:00 am to 5:00 pm
  • Admission: Free
  • Tel: +52 (55) 5515-1094
  • Email: None
  • Website: None
  • Parking: Limited
  • Services: You can purchase flowers at stands outside the entrance gate.
  • Additional Information: Annual Cine en los Pánteones, a horror film series presented by Morbidofest.com. Tradicional Feria del Hueso (Traditional Festival of Bones) during Day of the Dead observations, November 1

Parque Acuático Atlantis

  • Location: Avenida Constituyentes, Third section of the Bosque de Chapultepec, Colonia Lomas Altas
  • How to Get There:
  • By Taxi: from Paseo de la Reforma, about MX$40/US$4.
  • By Métro/Bus: From Chapultepec Métro station take a #24 Pánteon de Dolores/Hacienda bus and ask the driver to stop at Parque Atlantis.
  • By car: Travel south on Av. Constituyentes and exit right, two traffic signals after the cemetery named Panteón de Dolores.
  • Hours of Operation: During school vacations, Tuesday to Sunday, 10:00 am to 6:00 pm. Rest of the year, Saturday and Sunday only
  • Admission: MX$59/US$5.90, includes admission to four shows
  • Payment: Cash
  • Tel: +52 (55) 5273-8618
  • Fax: None
  • Email: convimar@prodigy.net.mx
  • Website: http://www.parqueatlantis.com.mx
  • Parking: Free
  • Services: Marine animal and tropical bird shows, aquarium, reptile house, swimming with dolphins, amusement park rides, restrooms, snack bar

Colonia Nápoles

Polyforum Siqueiros

  • Location: Insurgentes Sur No. 701, at the corner of Calle Filadelfia, Colonia Nápoles (next to World Trade Center)
  • How to Get There: Métro: Line 9, Chilpancingo Station.  Metrobús Insurgentes, Poliforum Station.
  • Hours of Operation: Daily, 9:00 am to 6:00 pm
  • Admission: MX$30/US$3
  • Payment: Cash
  • Tel: +52 (55) 5536-4520
  • Fax: +52 (55) 5523-4258
  • Email: infocultura@polyforumsiqueiros.com.mx
  • Website: polyforumsiqueiros.com
  • Parking: Limited street parking, parking garage
  • Services: Restrooms, restaurant, sale of publications, performances, gallery, exhibitions, conferences, meetings
  • Additional information: Sound and Light show, Saturday/Sunday, 11:30 am, 12:45 and 5:00 pm

Colonia Noche Buena

Plaza México

  • Location: Augusto Rodín No. 241, Col. Noche Buena (next to the Estadio Azul)
  • How to Get There: Métro: Line 7, San Antonio Station.  Metrobús Insurgentes: Ciudad de los Deportes Station
  • Hours of Operation: Sundays, 5:00 pm, approximately April to September
  • Admission: MX$90-231/US$9-23 at the box office or Ticketmaster
  • Payment: Cash, Visa, MasterCard
  • Tel: +52 (55) 5563-3961
  • Fax: None
  • Email: through website
  • Website: lamexico.com
  • Parking: Very limited street parking, off-site parking garages
  • Services: Restrooms, restaurant, bar
  • Additional information: Also presents boxing matches, concerts and other events

San Ángel

Getting to and away

  • Location: 10 km (6 mi) south of the city center and 3 km (2 mi) west of Coyoacán, Col. San Ángel
  • How to Get There: Métro: Line 7, Barranca del Muerto Station.  Metrobús Insurgentes: Altavista and La Bombilla Stations
  • Hours of Operation: NA
  • Admission: NA
  • Payment: NA
  • Tel: NA
  • Fax: NA
  • Email: NA
  • Website: No official website
  • Parking: Limited street parking, parking garages
  • Services: Restaurants, bars, shops, museums, church services

Bazar Sábado/Plaza San Jacinto

  • Location: Near Calles Frontera and Arteaga, Col. San Ángel
  • How to Get There: Métro: Line 7, Barranca del Muerto Station.  Metrobús Insurgentes: La Bombilla Station, then walk west 5 minutes on Calle Amargura
  • Hours of Operation: Saturdays, 9:00 am to 5:00 pm, or until closing
  • Admission: Free
  • Payment: NA
  • Tel: NA
  • Fax: NA
  • Email: NA
  • Website: NA
  • Parking: Very limited street parking
  • Services: Everything imaginable is for sale, including arts and crafts

Museo Casa del Risco (Centro Cultural Isidro Fabela)

  • Location: Plaza de San Jacinto No. 15. Col. San Ángel
  • How to Get There: Métro: Line 7, Barranca del Muerto Station.  Metrobús Insurgentes: La Bombilla Station, then walk west 5 minutes on Calle Amargura
  • Hours of Operation: Tuesday to Sunday, 10:00 am to 5:00 pm
  • Admission: Free
  • Payment: NA
  • Tel: +52 (55) 5616-2711
  • Fax: +52 (55) 5550-9286
  • Email: through website
  • Website: http://www.isidrofabela.com/
  • Parking: Limited street parking
  • Services: Restrooms, library, archive, exhibitions, activities
  • Additional information: Closed on national holidays: January 1, February 5, March 21, May 5, September 1, September 16, November 20, December 12, December 25

Museo del Carmen

  • Location: Av. Revolución No. 4, between Monasterio and Rafael Checa, Col. San Ángel
  • How to Get There: Métro: Line 7, Barranca del Muerto Station.  Metrobús Insurgentes: Bombilla Station, then walk west 5 minutes on Calle Amargura and turn left on Av. Revolución
  • Hours of Operation: Tuesday to Sunday, 10:00 am to 5:00 pm
  • Admission: MX$41/US$4.10. Free for children under 12, senior citizens, teachers and students. Sunday, free to all
  • Payment: Cash
  • Tel: +52 (55) 5550-4896
  • Fax: None
  • Email: elcarmenmuseo@gmail.com
  • Website: Official government site – Spanish only: http://dti.inah.gob.mx/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=138&Itemid=461
  • Unofficial website – Spanish only: museodelcarmen.org
  • Parking: Street parking only
  • Services: Restrooms, security guards, printed guide, workshops, temporary exhibitions, children’s activities
  • Additional information: Guided tours available with prior reservation (ext. 115), backpacks and large bags must be checked

Museo de Arte Carrillo Gil

  • Location: Av. Revolución No. 1608, between Calles Altavista and Río San Ángel, Col. San Ángel
  • How to get there: Métro: Line 7, Barranca del Muerto Station.  Metrobús Insurgentes: Altavista Station, then walk west 5 minutes on Av. Altavista to Av. Revolución
  • Hours of Operation: Tuesday to Sunday, 10:00 am to 6:00 pm
  • Admission: MX$15/US$1.50. Students/teachers, MX$9/US$1. Children under 12 and Seniors (with INAPAM card), free. Sundays, free to all
  • Payment: Cash
  • Tel: +52 (55) 5550-6260
  • Fax:  +52 (55) 5550-4232
  • Email: conexion@museodeartecarrillogil.com
  • Website: http://www.museodeartecarrillogil.com/
  • Parking: Limited street parking
  • Services: Restrooms, bookstore, café, library, video library, research services, temporary exhibitions
  • Additional information: backpacks and large bags must be checked

Museo Casa Estudio Diego Rivera y Frida Kahlo

  • Location: Calle Diego Rivera No. 2, at Av. Altavista, Col. San Ángel, (1km northwest of Plaza San Jacinto)
  • How to Get There: Métro: Line 7, Barranca del Muerto station.  Metrobús Insurgentes: Altavista Station, then walk 15 minutes up Av. Altavista
  • Hours of Operation: Tuesday to Sunday, 10:00 am to 6:00 pm
  • Admission: MX$10/US$1. Free on Sunday
  • Payment: Cash
  • Tel: +52 (55) 5550-1189
  • Fax: +52 (55) 5550-1189, ext. 102
  • Email: mcedrfk@correo.inba.gob.mx
  • Website: http://www.museoestudiodiegorivera.es.tl/
  • Parking: Street parking
  • Services: Restrooms, publications, videos, workshops, temporary exhibitions
  • Additional information: additional MX$30/US$3 for taking photographs

Coyoacán

Getting to and away

  • Location: 10 km (6 mi) south of the city center and 3km (2 mi) east of San Ángel
  • How to Get There: Métro: Line 3, Viveros, Coyoacán and Miguel Ángel de Quevado Stations (Local buses available from the stations to the Main Square).  Metrobús Insurgentes: Francia and Olivo Stations. Walk east 3 km (2 mi).
  • Hours of Operation: NA
  • Admission: NA
  • Payment: NA
  • Tel: NA
  • Email: NA
  • Website: http://www.Coyoacán.df.gob.mx/
  • Parking: Limited street parking
  • Services: Accommodations, restaurants, bars, shops, museums, church services
  • Additional information: Tourist office in Casa de Cortés, on the north side of the Plaza Central. Daily, 9:00 am to 3:00 pm and 4:00 to 7:00 pm. Free walking tours in Spanish and English. +52 (55) 5658-0221

Plaza de la Conchita

  • Location: Calles Higuera and Vallarta, Coyoacán
  • How to Get There: Métro: Line 3, Viveros Station. From Plaza Hidalgo walk three blocks east on Calle Higuera.
  • Hours of Operation: Daily, 24 hours
  • Admission: Free
  • Payment: NA
  • Tel: NA
  • Email: NA
  • Website: NA
  • Parking: Limited street parking
  • Services: Public park
  • Additional information: Nearby is the Frida Kahlo Garden.

Plaza Central (Plaza Hidalgo and Jardín del Centenario)

  • Location: At Calle Centenario and Avenidas Hidalgo, Carrillo Puerto and Caballocalco, Coyoacán
  • How to Get There: Métro: Line 3, Viveros Station. From Viveros Métro station walk south on Av. Universidad and turn left on Calle Francisco Sosa
  • Hours of Operation: Daily, 24 hrs
  • Admission: Free
  • Payment: NA
  • Tel: None
  • Email: None
  • Website: None
  • Parking: Limited street parking
  • Services: Free Wifi
  • Additional information: Tranvia Trolley tour of Coyoacán departs from Calle Carrillo Puerto in front of San Juan Bautista Church. In Spanish (English language tour for groups of 20 or more by prior reservation), Daily: Every hour, 10:00 am to 8:30 pm, 45 minutes, MX$45/US$4.50, tranviadecoyoacan.com.mx

Museo Nacional de Culturas Populares

  • Location: Av. Hidalgo No. 289, Col. Del Carmen, Coyoacán
  • How to Get There: Métro: Line 3, Viveros Station. From Plaza Central walk 2 blocks east on Av. Hidalgo.
  • Hours of Operation: Tuesday through Thursday, 10:00 am to 6:00 pm. Friday through Sunday, 10:00 am to 8:00 pm
  • Admission: MX$11/US$1.10. Free daily to children under twelve and senior citizens above 60, the disabled, and students and teachers with proper identification. Sundays, free to all
  • Payment: Cash
  • Tel: +52 (55) 4155-0920
  • Email: cpmncp@conaculta.gob.mx
  • Website: http://www.culturaspopulareseindigenas.gob.mx/
  • Parking: Limited street parking
  • Services: Restrooms, temporary exhibitions
  • Additional information: Handicap accessible. Backpacks and large bags must be checked.

Museo Frida Kahlo

  • Location: Londres 247, between Calles Allende and Abasolo, Col. Del Carmen, Coyoacán
  • How to Get There: Métro: Line 3, Viveros and Coyoacán Stations. From Plaza Central, walk north on Calle Allende and turn right on Londres.
  • Hours of Operation: Tuesday to Sunday, 10:00 am to 5:30 pm
  • Admission: General: MX$55/US$5.50. Students and teachers: MX$20/US$2. Admission also includes entrance to Anahuacalli Museum, which displays Diego Rivera’s collection of pre-Hispanic art
  • Payment: Cash
  • Tel: +52 (55) 5554-5999
  • Fax: +52 (55) 5658-5778
  • Email: relacionespublicas@museofridakahlo.org.mx
  • Website: http://www.museofridakahlo.org.mx/
  • Parking: Limited street parking
  • Services: Restrooms, cafeteria, gift shop, photograph exhibition, documentary films shown every hour. Guided Tours: MX$350/US$35, with advance reservation
  • Additional information: The museum is closed on January 1, February 5, March 21, May 1, September 16, November 20, December 1 every six years due to change of government, December 24 in the afternoon, December 25, December 31 in the afternoon. Backpacks and large bags must be checked.

Museo Casa de León Trotsky

  • Location: Av. Río Churubusco No. 410, between Calles Gómez Farías and Modelo (facing the Circuito Interior), Col. Del Carmen, Coyoacán
  • How to Get There: Métro Line 3, Viveros Station. From Plaza Central walk east on Calle Hidalgo, turn left on Calle Gómez Farías and right on Av. Río Churubusco. About seven blocks northeast of the Plaza Central
  • Hours of Operation: Tuesday to Sunday: 10:00 am – 5:00 pm.
  • Admission:  MX$35/US$3.50. Physically disabled people, students and senior citizens with a valid INAPAM ID: MX$20/US$2. Using a camera: MX$15/US$1.50
  • Payment: Cash
  • Tel: +52 (55) 5658-8732
  • Fax: : +52 (55) 5554-0687
  • Email: museotrotsky@hotmail.com
  • Website: http://museocasadeleontrotsky.blogspot.com/
  • Parking: Limited street parking
  • Services: Parking, restrooms, publications and souvenirs, library, audiovisual room, vending machines, audio guide in French and English. Call ahead for guided tours.
  • Additional information: The Trotsky House Museum is owned and operated by the Asylum Rights Institute, which helps people seeking refuge in México today and whose offices are in the adjacent building.

University Area

  • Hours of Operation: Daily
  • Admission: Free
  • Payment: NA
  • Tel: individual numbers available through website
  • Fax: individual numbers available through website
  • Email: individual addresses available through website
  • Website: http://www.unam.mx/index/en
  • Parking: Paid parking lots
  • Services: Complete services including restrooms, food and beverages, ATMs and medical facility
  • Additional information: Access to university facilities may be limited during school vacations.

Getting to and away

  • Location: Between Av. Insurgentes Sur and Eje 10 Sur, Col. Tlalpán (2 km/1.5 miles south of San Ángel, near the Periférico)
  • How to Get There: Métro: Line 3, Copilco or Universidad Stations.  Metrobús Insurgentes: Dr. Galvez or Ciudad Universitaria Stations.

The Library (and Juan O’Gorman mosaic)

  • Location: Autonomous National University of México (UNAM), Circuito Interior, Ciudad Universitaria, Col. Tlapan
  • How to Get There: Métro: Line 3, Copilco or Universidad Stations.  Metrobús Insurgentes: Dr. Galvez or Ciudad Universitaria Stations.
  • Hours of Operation: Daily, 8:30 am to 9:30 pm
  • Admission: Free
  • Payment: NA
  • Tel: +52 (55) 5622-1603
  • Fax: +52 (55) 5622-1601/5622-1632
  • Email: web-bc@dgb.unam.mx
  • Website: http://bc.unam.mx/
  • Parking: Paid parking lots
  • Services: Restrooms, guided tours (1 hour, with two weeks notification required)
  • Additional information: The extent of the library’s collection is mind-boggling: 428,000 books in the general collection, 70,000 rare books dating to 1450, 3,507 periodicals, 329,663 documents in digital formats, and 4,100 audiovisual materials.
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